Thread By Thread: Costumes on Screen

I Do, I Do, I Do, Part 2!

On with the show! I’ve already covered some really gorgeous gowns in my previous posts, so let’s get started on revealing some more of my favorites!

Justine’s Wedding Gown from Melancholia

The large chiffon flowers of her bolero nod to the romantic puffy sleeves of the past, making her the picture of a bride even if she doesn’t behave as one should.

The large chiffon flowers of her bolero nod to the romantic puffy sleeves of the past, making her the picture of a bride even if she doesn’t behave as one should.

Playful and modern yet romantic Justine’s wedding gown floats about her at first, large yet flowing.

Playful and modern yet romantic Justine’s wedding gown floats about her at first, large yet flowing.

In this visually captivating film, young bride Justine fights an ongoing battle with a deep Depression on her wedding day, slowly and methodically ruining her wedding gown throughout the course of her wedding night. Justine looks every bit the blushing bride at the open of the film, the voluminous layers of her chiffon gown with flowers and a rouched bodice enveloping her and her new husband as they struggle to get the limo up the driveway to the reception. The layers act as a cloud initially, soft and ethereal in the fading daylight. As the film progresses the volume of the gown takes on a new meaning, her gown becomes stifling and drags along with her rather than floating, she moves listlessly throughout her party, even taking a soak in the tub while still in the gown at one point.  When given the opportunity to escape her gown by her new husband she instead insists to be zipped back in and goes out to the party once more.  Her gown also serves as a way for us to understand her sister Claire’s dismay as she watches Justine unravel; destroying the picturesque gown she bought her in hopes that she may finally have won her battle with Depression.

With the “dress-up” elements of her veil and flowered bolero gone, Justine’s dress is less fanciful, though it retains its beauty while its wearer wilts.

With the “dress-up” elements of her veil and flowered bolero gone, Justine’s dress is less fanciful, though it retains its beauty while its wearer wilts.

Jo Stockton’s Wedding Gown from Funny Face

The short gown and simple hair style are a classic example of the new fashion simplicity swept in by Dior’s New Look, though the gown was designed by Hubert de Givenchy.

The short gown and simple hair style are a classic example of the new fashion simplicity swept in by Dior’s New Look, though the gown was designed by Hubert de Givenchy.

The hooded veil adds a feeling of whimsy and youth to the dress, it’s a classic romantic silhouette in a new interpretation.

The hooded veil adds a feeling of whimsy and youth to the dress, it’s a classic romantic silhouette in a new interpretation.

Jo Stockton, may not have actually getting married but this stunning white gown she dons as a model in a Parisian fashion show is stunning. Created by Givenchy exclusively for the film the gown is a drop waist satin and tulle gown with a shortened bell shirt and features a hooded veil. The gown became iconic and set the presentence for wedding gowns in the 50s.  Ethereal and light with clean classic lines the gown is much simpler in look compared the full length lace and chiffon beaded creations of past. The gown even managed to maintain its look when it began to rain during filming of the dance sequence S’Wonderful in the film, Hepburn reportedly went through nine pairs of white satin slippers due to all the mud.

Having to dance in mud after weeks of rain prior to shooting the wedding dress dance sequence, Hepburn reportedly quipped “Here I’ve been waiting for twenty years to dance with Fred Astaire, and what do I get? Mud in my eye!”

Having to dance in mud after weeks of rain prior to shooting the wedding dress dance sequence, Hepburn reportedly quipped “Here I’ve been waiting for twenty years to dance with Fred Astaire, and what do I get? Mud in my eye!”

Penelope’s Wedding Gown from Penelope

The whimsy of Penelope’s gown fits right in with her unique room, the gown is composed of three pieces that when combined make a gown fitting of a fairytale.

The whimsy of Penelope’s gown fits right in with her unique room, the gown is composed of three pieces that when combined make a gown fitting of a fairytale.

Noticeable in this photo are the Crystals at the top of the corset, oh and (spoiler!) Penelope with a regular nose!

Noticeable in this photo are the Crystals at the top of the corset, oh and (spoiler!) Penelope with a regular nose!

This endearing modern fairytale about a young woman cursed with a pig’s nose feature and equally captivating wedding gown for Penelope. Destined to have her pig nose remain until she is accepted by one of her own kind, Penelope lives a sheltered life and runs away from home eager to experience life outside her home. After heartbreak Penelope returns home and is arranged to marry a fellow blue blood Edward Humphrey Vanderman III to finally break her curse. The white gown she wears was created by Costume Designer Jill Taylor to mirror the whimsy of Penelope’s story and remain classic at the same time. “The whole thing about this piece is that it could be set anytime, anyplace, anywhere, so we didn’t want to make it too English,” Taylor says. The gown is made of a patterned satin peaked corset complete with rhinestones and a silk skirt and a shredded silk chiffon train. The gown floats like feathers and looks beautiful on screen as Penelope escapes from her sham wedding and accepts herself and her nose as beautiful and an important part of herself.

Costume Designer  Jill Taylor designed the gown to have the same feel as Nicole Kidman’s pink Ostrich feather gown from the famous Chanel Commercial directed by Baz Lurhman, due to budget constraints shredded chiffon was used instead of the expensive Ostrich feathers.

Costume Designer Jill Taylor designed the gown to have the same feel as Nicole Kidman’s pink Ostrich feather gown from the famous Chanel Commercial directed by Baz Lurhman, due to budget constraints shredded chiffon was used instead of the expensive Ostrich feathers.

Clare’s Wedding Gown from The Time Travelers Wife

Barely noticeable at the top edge of her gown, is two rows of white piping, a small but beautiful detail to the classic dress.

Barely noticeable at the top edge of her gown, is two rows of white piping, a small but beautiful detail to the classic dress.

The gown is similar to a ball gown but is much more free and flowing in shape; matching Clare’s romantic notions yet real life troubles of marrying a Time Traveler.

The gown is similar to a ball gown but is much more free and flowing in shape; matching Clare’s romantic notions yet real life troubles of marrying a Time Traveler.

Finally, a wedding gown worn to a wedding that isn’t a sham, albeit she does marry a future version of her husband after he time travels moments before walking down the aisle.  Costume Designer Julie Weiss says that she used the characters’ careers as inspiration for their wedding day attire “Can you imagine designing a wedding for someone who was an artist and another person who spends his days in a library? They know images. They know romance. They know that creative spirit as well.” The ceremony takes place in her family estate’s backyard, where she first met Time Traveler Henry when she was just five.  Eagar to live up to the fairytale circumstances surrounding her romance with Henry she wears a classic cut  while silk organza ball gown by Lea-Ann Belter Bridal. Custom details were added to the ensemble to better fit Clare, such as her pale green sash and organza flowers attached to her cathedral length veil. The clean classic lines and flowing veil provide timelessness to Clare, making her easily recognizable and memorable to the time traveling Henry.

Bella’s Wedding Gown from Twilight: Breaking Dawn-Part 1

The front of the dress looks more modern than the back, while echoing the Edwardian era in lines, the smoothness of the fabric as well as stitching and panels in the front of the dress look more modern and sleek.

The front of the dress looks more modern than the back, while echoing the Edwardian era in lines, the smoothness of the fabric as well as stitching and panels in the front of the dress look more modern and sleek.

Many fans’ favorite part of the dress is the lace keyhole back with buttons going all the way down the back of the dress, a beautiful vintage feature.

Many fans’ favorite part of the dress is the lace keyhole back with buttons going all the way down the back of the dress, a beautiful vintage feature.

When Bella & Edward say that they will love each other until the end of time in their wedding vows, they mean it, and the celebration matched the young(ish) lovers timeless vows. The reveal of Bella’s gown was much anticipated by viewers, and they were not disappointed. Described in the book as being  Edward’s mother’s wedding gown from the late nineteenth century, long sleeved with lace details and a classic Edwardian lines.  Costume Designer Michael Wilkinson handed over the reigns for Bella’s wedding gown over to famed fashion designer Caroline Herrera, who was handpicked by author Stephanie Myer to design the gown after the two struck up a friendship when Herrera dressed Myer for several occasions.  Herrera described the dress as being a combination of Myer’s description of the dress in the book and her own fashion house’s bridal aesthetic. “[The dress] is not too girly, I thought it really hit the right note of having some vintage elements while working well for a modern woman,” Herrera says. “It’s made of a crepe satin with two inserts on the front and beautiful silk thread top stitching. The neckline is a slight V, just enough to see the collarbones. The back is oval-shaped, with a Chantilly lace border veiled in tulle. It’s very romantic, and when all the details come together, it creates a vision specific to Bella’s style and personality,” Herrera describes the dress as being. Paired with a cathedral length veil and a blue jeweled head piece Bella stuns viewers and Edward when she walks down the aisle.

Caroline Herrera’s sketch for the gown.

Caroline Herrera’s sketch for the gown.

So readers! I’ve covered over eighteen movie wedding gowns! Take the poll below and let me know which gown is your favorite! If you have a favorite movie wedding gown I didn’t know let me know in the comments, and it may show up in a future post!

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This entry was published on November 30, 2012 at 11:13 am. It’s filed under Entertainment, Nov. 2012 and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

2 thoughts on “I Do, I Do, I Do, Part 2!

  1. Penelope’s dress is AMAZING. ❤

  2. Oooo this was hard!!! I chose Mary Jane Watsons in the end because every time I watch that scene I think it suits Kirsten, the character and the character’s decision to run away from her wedding – perfectly.

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